Music


Let the truth be told from young souls that become old.

From days spent in the jungle, where must one go?

To find it, time is real, we can’t rewind it.

Out of everybody I met, who told the truth? Time did.

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What up Toronto?

It’s May, the weather is consistently in the mid teens and it’s officially patio weather. What this also means is that most of ya’ll will be heading downtown on the regular. Regardless of how you get downtown, one thing is sure, you’re gonna need something to vibe to. Wether it’s in your ride with the windows rolled down driving 2 miles an hour so everyone can see you; or in your ipod, I got you covered. Hip Hop, House and everything in between, these mixtapes will have you bumpin’ your head all summer long.

DJ M-Rock 

The Best of A Tribe Called Quest

Download


DJ Surreal Sound 

The Last Stand Mixtape (Hip Hop)

Download

Soul Shocker

Download


DJ Miss Kittie

Blahzay Blah

Download

Boot Camp Kit Sessions V.7

Download


“The greatest rapper of all time, died on March 9th.”

 

In all honesty, I haven’t heard a good mixtape in a while. This one blew me away. The Best of Kanye West mixed by the amazing DJ M-Rock is by far the best mixtape I’ve heard in a long while. This is an absolute MUST HAVE for any Hip Hop or Kanye West fan.

Download The Best of Kanye West

 

I never thought I would be writing this letter. It’s something I have thought about for some time, but just couldn’t bring myself to do it. This is very hard for me, but it’s the right time.

I met you when I was 9 years old. My boys, who were a little older, used to kick it with you in the park. They would sit and listen to you speak for hours on end, taking in every word you had to say. They would say to me “you have to listen to her speak.” Many times they recited your words to me; they had your poems memorized. I wont’ lie, your words were dope. Soon I was there with them, listening to you. Hanging on every word. Finding harmony in your poems.

Your poems were about a life I never knew existed. Even though I never experienced what you talked about, I could feel your emotions as if I had lived it. While many disapproved of what you had to say, more and more were listening to you. It wasn’t long till I fell in love with you. You were the first of the only two loves I would ever know.

We grew up together. Through my teens, you were the only one I would listen to. I would try to learn every one of your poems. Some of my friends would be amazed at how many of them I had memorized. A few laughed at how immersed I would be emotionally when reciting your words. You were with me through most of my firsts, experiencing them together. Through out my teens I found comfort in your words. It didn’t matter what was going on in my life, I always felt like you understood me. I can’t count the hours that I spent alone with you, just listening to you, silently. I still remember this one night. It was a Friday. Me and the boys were a little older. It was my first time drinking. It was dark and late. We were by the jungle gyms. We always hung out there because it was away from the walking path and the lamps. You were there as always, speaking to us. I drank a lot that night. I don’t remember most of it. I do remember your words. I remember how vivid the emotions felt as you spoke. I had never felt them this profoundly; maybe it was the alcohol. I remember reciting along with you; every word as if I had written them. We all did. We didn’t stop, even as we walked home while the sun was coming up.

Through most of my life I always kept current with every one of your new poems. We grew together, matured together, and changed together. As we grew older, so did your audience. You poems were being accepted by the majority rather than the minority. Your popularity was never higher and you were attracting a larger audience. Your poems started to change, the emotions in your words changed. While most of your poems appealed to a broader audience, you still managed to write some for the few of us that had been listening to you from the beginning. Yet, we continued to grow older; continued to grow apart.

Over the last few years I’ve come to realize, your poems are no longer meant for me. They’re for a newer audience, a younger audience. Without realizing it, I started to move on. I still listen to a lot of your new poems, but I would be lying if I told you I felt the same emotion as I did in my younger years. Those you recited to me as I grew up will always be a big part of my life. I still listen to them and even though I have moved on, just remember that I will always love you… Hip Hop.

As for the other love, I’m not ready to write that letter to her.

I came across this feed on twitter. Complex magazine compiled Hip-Hop’s 50 Greatest Album Covers, in their opinion. Anyone who knows me, knows my love affair with Hip-Hop. I grew up on Hip-Hop in the 90’s. Educated myself on Hip-Hop from the 80’s. So this article was very interesting. Also very disappointing. In my personal opinion, a lot of the album covers did not belong on that list. A lot of Hip-Hop album covers are the same. They feature the artist or group posing. That’s not original or eye-catching. It’s boring. Sadly this list features a lot of them. But, what’s great about Hip-Hop and art is that everyone looks at it from a different view.

Take a look at the list. What album covers do you think should have been included? Which ones should have been left off?

http://best.complex.com/lists/Hip-Hops-50-Greatest-Album-Covers

My favorite album cover is the Redman cover featured above. It ranked 49 on the list.

The bullpen door opens. It’s him, he’s the guy, the guy that’s going to seal the deal. The final nail in the coffin. It’s the 9th, the most important inning and in his hands is where you want the ball to be. Bases empty or juiced, he’s that guy.

You know it’s him, ‘cuase you heard the dong of the bells, the slow somber bells; followed by the hard electric guitar… then the drums… then the beat explodes and he appears through the swung bullpen doors… Trevor Hoffman.

The music hits you, the slow start creating anticipation as you recognize the song, the rhythm grabs you and then it explodes into intimidation as you sing the words getting ready for the 9th. It’s the closer.

The entrance music for the closer sets the stage for the 9th inning. The music creates an atmosphere at the park. An atmosphere of intimidation to the guys on the other side. It let’s them know, you’re here to close the deal, it’s over. Some closers in the majors really got the right song for entering into a save situation. What would make a good song for the situation? Well it would be a song that would have to

  1. Slow Start – the song would have to have a slower introduction, one that’s recognizable and builds anticipation before the song really gets going.
  2. Recognizable – a song that is recognizable to the majority of people; even those who aren’t regular listeners of that genre can recognize the song.
  3. Intimidating – a song that is hard, loud, rough, instills fear. Genre’s like metal, hard rock, even some hip hop could work, but you can’t have a closer come into a game to a Boyz II Men song.

Some of the closers in this league got some really good music that they enter to. Here’s a list of some of the ones I feel are really good and the few that make me scratch my head.

The Good

Trevor Hoffman: AC/DC – Hells Bells

Mariano Rivera: Metallica – Enter Sandman

Keith Foulke: Danzig – Mother

Billy Wagner: Metallica – Enter Sandman

Jonathan Papelbon: Dropkick Murphys – Shipping Up to Boston (This only works in Boston)

Chad Qualls: Rage Against the Machine – Killing in the Name of

Jose Valverde: Notorious B.I.G. Big Poppa (Love this one, click his name, take a look at the man, then you’ll see why)

Troy Percival: Godsmack – Keep Away

Huston Street: Nas – Hate Me Now

Rob Nen: Deep Purple – Smoke on the Water

John Smoltz: AC/DC – Thunderstruck

Eric Gagne: Guns N Roses – Welcome to the Jungle

Fernando Rodney: Angel y Khriz – Ven Ballalo (Gotta have some latin flavor)

The Bad

Jonathan Broxton: Chuck Berry – Johnny B. Goode

Armando Benitez: Jay-Z – Big Pimpin’ (I remember jamming it up to this song back in 99/00, but I think this jam would be a better intro for a catcher as he walks to the plate. As my boy eyebleaf over at Sports And The City said of one Raul Chavez, who’s got a rocket for an arm behind the plate, and I quote “He throws bitches out like a pimip”.)

Brad Lidge: Drowning Pool – The Game

The Ugly

Brandon Lyon (Red Sox): The Lion Sleeps Tonight

I wonder what Scott “The Snake” Downs’ entrance music is. If he doesn’t have one maybe we could come up with one for him. I’m thinking going with the whole snake theme, he could go with Jake “The Snake” Roberts theme from the WWF. Not a really intimidating song, but got a decent intro. Or maybe he could go with M.O.P. – Ante Up… that songs hard, rough, grimey, gets you fired up. Or maybe Jimi Hendrix – Voodoo Child.

What would you pick as your entrance music?

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